Lever's Health Soap (still) sold here!

Late 1920s metal sign from the MOFBA collection: Lever's Hygiene Medical Soap sold here
Late 1920s metal sign from the MOFBA collection: Lever's Hygiene Medical Soap sold here

When British Lever Brothers launched Lifebuoy soap in 1894, it was with a mission to ‘make cleanliness commonplace’. This was important because in Victorian England infectious diseases were the number one cause of death. Lifebuoy came to the rescue with an effective antibacterial soap which was affordable and widely available. 

 

The company first entered China in 1911 when the newly created 'Lever Brothers China' (LBC) took over from treaty port agents the distribution of Lever Brothers soap to wholesale dealers. By 1915, LBC managed about thirty percent of all British soap exports to China, had a head office in Shanghai, a branch office in Canton, and agency and sale depots in ten cities scattered all over China. 

Because the concept of a lifebuoy was not commonly known in China, the brand was instead localized as “Lever’s Health Soap”, with its Chinese name emphasizing the medical value proposition even more, literally translating to “Lever’s Hygiene Medical Soap” (利华卫生药皂). 

 

Lever's Health Soap ad from the Shun Pao May 14th 1934 emphasizing the hygiene benefit through a three panel comic
Lever's Health Soap ad from the Shun Pao May 14th 1934 emphasizing the hygiene benefit through a three panel comic

The Chinese word for hygiene “weisheng”, in fact had a much wider connotation than it’s English meaning:

 

By the turn of the twentieth century, nationalist Chinese reformers, anxious to meet foreign standards, had begun to recast local hygiene precepts. Until then, the expression weisheng referred to the various regimes of diet, meditation, and self-medication that individuals exercised in order to guard their health.

 

However, as Chinese intellectuals debated how their country could achieve modern status, the meaning of weisheng "shifted away from Chinese cosmology and moved to encompass state power, scientific standards of progress, the cleanliness of bodies, and the fitness of races". 

By 1924, LBC, now operating under the name 'China Soap Company', to mitigate anti-foreign prejudice, began to manufacture toilet/laundry soap in its own factory located in the industrial area of Shanghai's International Settlement – see our field report on the factory’s remains here. CSC set up an extensive 'up-country' distribution system using depots, agents, sub-depots, and sub-agents employing local dealers to market the six brands of soap the company manufactured: Sunlight, Health Soap, Lux, Swan, Velvet, Skin, and Zulu. 

 

In September 1929, Unilever was formed by a merger of the operations of Dutch Margarine Unie and Lever Brothers, named as a blend of the two firms' names. Nonetheless in China the iconic Health Soap was continued to be advertised under the Lever brand. 

After the Communist liberation in 1949 the China Soap Company factory was nationalized.

 

It still exists today under the name Shanghai Soap Co., Ltd. and is one of Chinas largest producers of soap, including being manufacturer of the “Shanghai Medical Soap”, who’s design to this day bears a striking resemblance to the old Lever Hygiene Medical Soap…

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